Portland Inspiration Album

Just some of my favorite pics from my week long trip to inspire you to plan a trip to Portland, Oregon! Enjoy the delicious eats, beautiful scenery, and unique PNW vibe ūüôā

 

Flying into the PNW

 

Tonkatsu Ramen from Marukin

 

The Voodoo Doll from Voodoo Donuts

 

International Rose Test Garden

 

International Rose Test Garden

 

Hoyt Arboretum

 

Pad Thai from Baan Thai Restaurant

 

Council Crest View Point

 

Burgers and truffle fries from PDX Sliders

 

Old Salmon River Trail in Mount Hood National Forest

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Old Salmon River Trail in Mount Hood National Forest

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The Reggie from Pine State Biscuits

 

Oceanside Beach

 

Oceanside Beach

 

Oswald State Park

 

Pittock Mansion View Point

 

Pittock Mansion

 

Lunch at Breitenbush Retreat

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breitenbush hot springs

Breitenbush Hot Springs

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Oregon really has it all. The amazing hikes, the beautiful beaches and coast, and of course a vibrant city with a delicious food scene and wild nightlife. If you’ve been considering a trip to Portland, book it! Just one week was all it took for me to completely fall in love with the city.

Love,
Di

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Breitenbush Review: The Clothing Optional Hot Springs in Portland

Breitenbush is a clothing optional hot spring and lodge about two hours outside of Portland. The whole wellness industry is big here, and you’ll find centers for it scattered all around the city. Most of them involve paying a set fee for a sauna and hot tub soak, massages, acupuncture, yoga, or all of the above, and Breitenbush is no different.

The retreat center has a large lodge, hiking trails in the scenic Mount Hood National Forest, multiple hot springs, massages, yoga classes, a meditation sanctuary, and cabins for overnight stays all spread across their remote piece of land. It sounded so very “Portland” to me that I just had to go check it out for a day, and of course write this Breitenbush review to tell you all about it!

 

lodge at breitenbush

 

Costs and Reservation

Breitnebush offers a sliding scale of payment, which means that a day pass can cost you anywhere from $20 to $35. They’ll just ask you on the phone and you can pick what you’d like to pay. I also had to pre-order any meals I wanted for $15 each. I opted for lunch only (served from 1-2), but they also have breakfast and dinner daily.

The actual reservation process is pretty old school. It’s still not possible to make one online (but you can check availability here) so you’ll have to call during business hours to lock in your slot and pay with a card over the phone.

 

river at breitenbush

 

Getting There

Breitenbush really prides itself for being off the grid, so they have no wifi or cell service and getting there can be a little tricky. The drive is two hours from Portland, and the retreat sits just outside the tiny town of Detroit, Oregon.

When I made my reservation, Breitenbush sent multiple emails that stressed that the backroads are treacherous and if I tried to use GPS I was doomed to be lost in them forever… but that’s not the case. All you have to do to get there is plug “Detroit” into your GPS, and once you arrive you can follow the signs for a few miles until you arrive at Breitenbush. Easy.

 

What to do at Breitenbush

The most popular activity at Breitenbush is definitely soaking in the clothing optional hot springs. They have four man-made spiral pools on one side of the land, and three natural pools on other with varying heat levels. The last one is the hottest, and also requires absolute silence.

I enjoyed soaking in the springs for a couple hours during my trip, especially when a family of five deer came and ate in the field right in front of us! It was cool to connect with the wild so closely, and I won’t deny it’s an extremely unique experience. The view from all of the springs are beautiful, but the last silent pool was definitely my favorite.

 

breitenbush hot springs

 

Because I arrived around 11:30am, I only had about an hour before it was time for the 1pm lunch in the cafeteria (or you can opt for silent eating in the library as well). I felt like I was back in school lining up and hitting the buffet, but honestly the all-vegetarian food was really good. The menu is ever changing but I thoroughly enjoyed the falafel sandwich, salad, and basil lemonade.

After lunch, I went on a short hike on the trails and then soaked the hot springs again. Around 3:15 I decided I was done, hit the showers, and packed up to leave. However, heading out at 4pm was a mistake because I reached Portland juuuuust in time for that rush hour traffic. I’d recommend timing your departure either earlier or later to make sure you miss it.

 

sandwich and salad for lunch at breitenbush

 

So, Would I Go Back?

Honestly… no. I really wanted to love it and feel ultra-relaxed, but the truth is I just wasn’t a huge fan.

I like wifi and meat, I suck at yoga, and I get bored in quiet places. I know there are plenty of people who are into meditation and getting unplugged to find their inner self, but the vibe just wasn’t for me. It was kind of relaxing, but by the afternoon the pools were starting to get cloudy (ew) and I was definitely ready to go after only four hours at the lodge.

If Daniel had been there though, I think I might have enjoyed it more. I’m glad I went, but I also thought $40 payment was a bit steep and think there’s other, better things to do in Portland for the price (like go for a free,¬†easy hike in Mount Hood National Forest¬†and then use that money on dinner, drinks, or a million other things).

 

river at breitenbush

 

Breitenbush Review

Honestly, I know that there are plenty of people who love this place and I really get why they do, but the Breitenbush retreat isn’t for everyone. It has its pros: nice mountain views, delicious food, and natural hot springs, and some cons: far from Portland, kinda pricey, and no wifi or cell service.

You all know yourself best, and know if you’d enjoy the place or not! If you’re interested, give it a try and let me know what you think!

All my love,
Di

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Old Salmon River Trail: An Easy Hike in Mount Hood National Forest

If you’re looking for an easy hike in Mount Hood National Forest, the Old Salmon River Trail is a great choice.

When my sister and I went visited Mount Hood in late March we thought we would be able to hike anywhere, but we were so wrong. The snow was still packed in on almost all of the trails! Unfortunately we were not prepared for snowshoeing or winter hiking, so we had to return to the Zig Zag Ranger Station and the trails at the start of the forest, where the snow was melted.

We asked for an easy hike in Mount Hood National Forest, and the ranger recommended Old Salmon River Trail. It’s almost two miles out and back (four miles total) and has very little incline. It’s also located in a surreal and stunning moss covered forest along the banks of the wild and rushing Old Salmon River.

This hike does NOT have views of Mount Hood, but if you’re in the park on a rainy or cloudy day and want to experience the classic PNW atmosphere, this is a great choice for any and all skill and fitness levels. The best way to get there is to just plug the “Old Salmon River Trailhead” into your GPS, or stop by the Zig Zag Ranger Station that’s just a minute or two up the road for directions.

If you’re still on the fence, check out my photos below to see why you should add this easy hike in Mount Hood National Forest to your Portland to-do list!

 

old salmon river trail, portland, oregon

 

old salmon river trail, portland, oregon

 

old salmon river trail, portland, oregon

 

old salmon river trail, portland, oregon

 

old salmon river trail, portland, oregon

 

The Old Salmon River Trail is beautiful, easy, and a great hike during the spring or fall when options in Mount Hood National Forest are limited from the snowfall. Explore the trail, enjoy the scenery, and comment below to let me know what you think!

All my love,
Di

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Hiking in Mexico City: Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

If you’re looking for hiking in Mexico City, Cumbres del Ajusco National park will definitely be on your radar. Although I personally prefer hiking in Izta-Popo National Park¬†because I enjoyed the erupting volcanos, during a long-term stay, Cumbres del Ajusco is worth visiting as well. Here’s is everything you need to know to get there!

 

 

Why Go to Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

There are a few reasons. First, Ajusco is the 4th tallest mountain in the country (Izta and Popo come in at third and second). Second, the park is cool because it was created in 1936 and is the third oldest national park in the country (only Desierto de Los Leones and Izta-Popo national park are older).

Finally, it’s unique in that it actually makes up half of the Mexico City Federal District! I was pretty surprised that one of the biggest and most polluted cities in the world was actually half national park…

 

How to Get to Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

So, you have two options. The first is to take an uber. This is what we did, and I though it would be super easy, right? Wrong! First of all, the driver had no idea where we were going (whyyyy pick up ride then?!) and didn’t know how to use GPS somehow… so we stopped and asked for directions multiple times despite me begging him to use my phone instead.

ANYWAY. If you choose to take an uber and your driver knows where to go, there’s still the issue of traffic. The ride will take you anywhere between an hour and an hour and a half depending on what time of day you go, so waking up super early will be your best bet.

When you go, make sure you use this address in your GPS:¬†Cerro Pico del √Āguila km 21, Col. H√©roes de 1910

The cost to get to the park from Mexico City by Uber should be around 250 pesos. We paid 220, but if you get stuck in a lot of traffic, I think the price can go up.

The other way to get to Cumbres del Ajusco National Park is by bus. Go to the Universidad Station and ask for the one going to San Miguel Ajusco. The trip costs 7 pesos per person and the ride will take about an hour and a half.

From San Miguel Ajusco, you’ll need to get a taxi to the trailhead. That will be about another 15 to 20 minutes, and will probably cost around 100 pesos because most drivers will be stuck doing a round trip. Make sure you put the above address in your GPS again, because there’s no real official entrance to the park (that I know of anyway) or trailhead, so your driver probably won’t know where to go unless you show him.

So basically, if you add up the taxi to the bus station and the taxi to the trail, the costs come close to just taking an Uber. The prices are similar but an Uber is faster, so that’s what I recommend.

 

 

Hiking up Cerro Ajusco

Yes! You made it to the park! When you’re getting dropped off, you’ll pass the GPS pin on your phone and see nothing but forest on the side of the road, just ask your driver to keep going a minute or two further until you get to the restaurants. There will be a couple on the right side of the road, and one on the left. There will also be a big sign with a map of the park on the left as well.

If you’re facing the restaurant on the left side of the road (or if you come from the other direction and my instructions are confusing, just make sure you’re facing the side with only one large restaurant and not a few small ones). Go to the left of the restaurant and you will see a trail leading into the woods.

Take the trail for a few minutes and it will come out onto a road. Keep walking up it and go through a gate and through a playground. Here you will come to a sketchy bridge. Cross it, and take the trail to the left.

Once you’re on the trail to the left, you’re good to go! It’s pretty well maintained, you’ll probably see a few other people on it, and anytime it splits there’s usually markers pointing you in the right direction.

The trail stayed flat for about 45 minutes, then started to go sharply uphill. The climb was really tough actually, especially in the high altitude (the park is at 12,795 feet). We decided to stop and just enjoy the view about halfway up instead of finish the climb. It really was beautiful, on one side the park stretched out, and on the other was Mexico City. Try to get there early if you can, we went in the afternoon and the skyline was pretty much totally covered in smog unfortunately.

If you do decide to go all the way to the top of Cerro Ajusco, it will take you about three hours (depending on how fast you hike) and then a couple more to get down. Definitely pack some snacks, enough water, and sunscreen!

 

 

What else to do in Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

So, this section is pretty much only for people driving in their own cars. Just from looking around google it seems like there is more to do in the park if you go to the right places, like ride bikes, go on a horesback ride, rent cabins, etc. I can’t find much info on where that’s located, but if you search in Spanish you may have better luck, or just drive through the park and stop where ever looks interesting! We only got to see a small piece of it, but there’s definitely more to do if you have the time.

 

Lunch in Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

Ok, back to the hike. Once you get back down to the road, eat at the restaurant where you started! The food is really good, and really cheap. I had a beef sope and barbacoa taco, and Dan had three tacos. Each item was only 25 pesos. When we were there the sun was shining and groups were day drinking, it was a super relaxed atmosphere. Too bad we had such a trek back home, otherwise I definitely would have stayed for a few more beers!

 

 

Getting Back to Mexico City

Ok, this is where the transportation gets kind of annoying. Theres basically no way to get back down the mountain because there’s no service to call an Uber, and no taxis driving by.

We asked the waiter what we should do, and he told us his dad would give us a ride! So, that was nice. We paid him 100 pesos to drop us off at the bus station.

From there, it was a 1.5 hour bus to Mexico City, and then a 20 minute Uber back to our apartment. The taxi plus bus plus Uber combo to get home took over two hours, and only cost four pesos less than the entire Uber trip on the way out… yeah.

I’d suggest skipping the bus and trying to get a taxi or Uber straight from San Miguel Ajusco back to the city.

 

Hiking in Cumbres del Ajusco National Park

I kind of have mixed feelings about hiking in Cumbres del Ajusco. The nature was really nice and the views were beautiful. However, the transport situation was annoying at times, and definitely long. If you have a car, this is a perfect day trip from Mexico City, otherwise, visit at your own risk!

All my love,
Di

PS explore my Mexico page for more Mexico City inspo including hiking, weekend trips, craft beer, and evening acitivites from my month in the city.

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9 Evening Activities in Mexico City Perfect for any Budget

Yes, you know all about the day trips and awesome parks in Mexico City, but where can you spend an evening here?? As a digital nomad, it can be really hard to find destination recommendations that aren’t aimed at traditional vacationers with all day to kill.

Luckily, I’m here to help. I spent one month living and working here, and this is my list of the top nine evening activities in Mexico City!

 

1. Check Out Biblioteca Vasconcelos

Time: Open until 7:30 pm
Cost: Free Entrance

 

Girl in Biblioteca Vasconcelos

 

This was the very first place I went in Mexico City. After seeing the amazing pictures online, I knew I had to get there.

Biblioteca Vasconcelos is perfect if you love photography, or just getting off the beaten path in a new city. Spend time admiring the views from every floor, snapping some insta worthy shots, or just sitting quietly with a book to read. The library also has gardens surrounding it that you can check out on a sunny day, and balconies on the top floor with expansive views of the city.

 

side view of the book shelves at biblioteca vasconcelos

 

This is possibly the most unique building I’ve ever seen, and it felt just like stepping into a sci-fi movie one thousand years in the future. For digital nomads, Biblioteca Vasconcelos is a must see evening activity in Mexico City.

 

2. Visit the Basilica de Guadalupe

Time: Open until 9pm
Cost: Free Entrance

The Basilica of Guadalupe is a major Catholic site in Mexico City. Your probably weren’t expecting a church on my list of evening activities in Mexico City (lol of course you were) but if you’re at all religious or interested in history or spirituality, this is a must-see. Even if you’re a firm atheist, it’s still an interesting stop just for the sheer importance of the site to the Catholic community.

What makes this church so special? In 1531 the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to a Mexican man, now Saint, named Juan Diego. The four apparitions occurred on a hill near this spot, and the Basilica was built as a shrine to commemorate it. It even holds Juan Diego’s cloak, which miraculously bears the image of Mary that is now famously known as Our Lady of Guadalupe.

There are now two Basilicas on the site (one old and one new), and both are currently open for exploration, prayer, and meditation.

 

3. Take a Cooking Class

Times: Chosen around your schedule
Cost: Around $50 to $80 usd per person

If you have room in the budget, this is a delicious and educational way to spend an evening in Mexico City. I mean, we all know Mexican food is one of the best cuisines in the world, so what better way to enjoy it than by learning all the techniques you need to make it at home? While researching it for my to do list, I found a few different class options you can check out here and here.

 

4. Take in the View at Torre Latinoamericana

Time: Open until 10pm
Cost: ~100 pesos per person

This famed tower was once the tallest in Mexico City, and is one of the most beautiful evening activities in Mexico City. Come for dinner, drinks, or just the view. You can buy tickets in the lobby for 90 pesos to head to the observation deck, or you can go to the restaurant, one floor lower, for free.

If you don’t want a whole dinner, you can just get a beer and still hang out at the bar for a bit and snap a few photos of the view. Just make sure you go on a day without smog!

 

5. Try Craft Beer at a Local Brewery

How convenient, I have a guide right here that doesn’t just list the best breweries in Mexico City, but ALL the breweries. It was actually pretty difficult to make because the craft beer scene in Mexico City is up and coming, and there’s not a lot of info from the breweries online yet.

My favorite brewery on the list is HOP 2, but I really enjoyed our visit to La Graciela and The Tasting Room as well. There are a bunch of breweries spread out across the city, so head out for your thirsty Thursday and try some beers you won’t be able to get anywhere else.

 

 

6. Wander the Quaint Neighborhood of Coyoacan

Time: Always Open
Cost: Free

This neighborhood is so cute, and great to explore day or night. Some people actually think it’s more lively in the evenings, and I have to agree.

Daniel and I went around 4:30pm and spent a few hours here. There is a large market, two beautiful squares, an ornate church, tons of hip bars, restaurants, cafes, and shops, and side streets lined with brightly painted houses and green leafy trees.

If you go, I recommend checking out Los Mercaderes Coyoacan for beautiful bottles of mezcal or tequila, grabbing a beer at the cool La Calaca Bar, and walking through the large Viveros de Coyoacan park.

 

7. Go to a Mexican Wrestling Match

Time: 7:30pm on weekdays, 8:30pm for the Friday matches
Cost: Tickets range from 100 to 420 pesos per person

Yes! Lucha Libre, or Mexican wrestling, is such an big part of Mexico’s culture in the city. There are matches every Friday, and you can buy tickets directly at the box office before they start. However, if you can’t make a Friday show or want to see more than one, there are sometimes fights during the week as well.

I definitely can’t guarantee it, but check out this calendar of events on Ticketmaster to see if any are coming up. If you can, choose one at Arena Mexico which is the main stage.

Daniel and I went to a Friday match and had soooo much fun. Even if you’re totally not into wrestling and don’t speak Spanish (check and check) the wild atmosphere and sheer absurdity of the event will get yelling and cheering along with everyone else.

 

Wrestling Match in Arena Mexico

 

8. Cheer on Club America at a Soccer Game

 

Time: Weekday matches start around 8:45pm
Cost: Tickets range from 150 to 1,000 pesos

Like the Lucha Libre events, these are totally dependent on schedule. Don’t look too far in advance though. Daniel and I checked the schedule a month before we arrived in Mexico City, and saw nothing listed. A few weeks later when we arrived, there were two games added in during our stay. They play at the famous Estadio Azteca, which is the biggest stadium in the country.

Unless it’s a really big match you can buy your tickets right at the stadium and have fun cheering on Club America, Mexico City’s official team. If you’re lucky enough to catch a game, it’s an awesome way to spend an evening in Mexico City!

 

9. See the Ballet Folklorico

Time: See the schedule here
Cost: Tickets range from around 360 to 1500 pesos

The ballet is a great evening activity in Mexico City because not only do you get to see a show, but it’s also located in the beautiful Palacio de Belles Artes. The building looks gorgeous day and night, and has a museum you can visit as well on your night out. If you want to learn more about the culture of Mexico, or just enjoy a good show, definitely try seeing the Ballet Folklorico after work.

 

If you’re looking for a fun evening activities in Mexico City, look no further. This list has something for every interest and every budget. If you’re a digital nomad in Mexico City and have more evening destinations to add to the list, please comment below and let me know!

All my love,
Di

PS for more things to do in Mexico City check out the rest of my articles here! 

 

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The Complete Guide to Breweries and Craft Beer in Mexico City

Craft beer in Mexico City is amazing, but trying to find out where it’s served is not. Seriously, putting together this article felt like investigative journalism at times.

My hunt for the best breweries encountered some major roadblocks, because a lot of the information online isn’t clear… specifically which bars serve craft beer, and which actually brew their own. It was also confusing to find which breweries have tap rooms, and which are just businesses that are closed to the public.

On Friday, Daniel and I showed up at Cerveceria Reforma because we believed it was a brewery open to the public (it’s not, yet). The owner, Ivan, came out to meet us and was genuinely confused why we were standing outside of his business!

We explained we were looking for craft beer, and he helpfully took us under his wing and got our search on the right track. Oh, and then a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit, his power went out, and we walked across the city together because none of us could get an Uber and the traffic was insane… Safe to say, our search for craft beer in Mexico City has been incredibly eventful.

I put a lot of work in finding the best beer tours, breweries, bars, and taprooms here, so you can enjoy them all on your next night out. I hope this complete guide helps everyone discover the up and coming awesome world of craft beer in Mexico City!

 

Turi Cervecero Beer Tour

Location: Click Here for a list of locations where you can buy tickets (the tour isn’t listed on the site at the moment, but it is definitely still running as of March 2018)

This beer tour is perfect for someone who wants to see a lot of what Mexico City has to offer in a short time frame. The tour is 400 pesos per person, and runs every Friday and Saturday evening for 4.5 hours.

They take you to visit four different breweries and taprooms, some of which aren’t even open to the public, like Cerveceria Reforma. The other options include Cru Cru, Hop 2, and Crisanta (breweries) and Sonny Diaz, Deposito, and Fiebre de Malta (bars).

The price of your ticket includes one beer at each of the four locations you visit. I haven’t done this tour, but it could definitely be a great and easy option to try some craft beer in Mexico City. If you check it out, please comment below or shoot me a message to tell me how it was!

 

Breweries in Mexico City

Daniel and I visited every single brewery in the capital’s city limits. This isn’t just some options you can try, it’s all of them. Keep reading to see locations, prices, my reviews, and more!

 

Taller de Cerveza La Graciela

Location: Orizaba 163, Roma Nte, 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX
More Info Here

This is a small brewery, restaurant, and bar, and one of my favorite places for craft beer in Mexico City. They have a window into their brew room that you can check out, outdoor seating on a lively sidewalk, and tons of different beer options.

You can try their own beers on tap, or browse a long list of bottles from both Mexico and around the world. I got a coffee stout (I’m a sucker for a stout) and Daniel got an IPA. Both were 100 pesos.

We went on a Saturday night and it had a really lively atmosphere. The best part about La Graciela is that it’s right next to a few other bars and an ice cream place, so this can be one stop for your entire night.

 

Escollo

Location: Calle Querétaro 182, Roma Nte, 06700 Mexico City, CDMX
More Info Here

Escollo was the first craft beer in Mexico City that I tried, and it was super strange because right when we walked in a saw a sign on the wall for Warped Wing!

Warped Wing is a brewery in my hometown in Ohio, and one of the stops in my DIY brewery walking tour of Dayton. Turns out, the two owners are friends and had created a beer together in 2015. Small world.

On to the beers themselves, Escollo is both a craft beer bar and a brewery, and they had eight different options of their own beers to try. I had the stout and Daniel had an IPA, but we actually each preferred each other’s and traded.

Escollo is good because the beers are pretty cheap, and you can even get some of their drafts for only 60 pesos. It’s also within walking distance to La Graciela. However, the atmosphere could definitely use some work… at 8pm on a Saturday night it was almost empty. If you want a quiet night out, this is the place, but if you’re looking for a lively brewery, there are better options.

 

Escollo Brewery in Mexico City

 

Crisanta

Location:¬†Av. Plaza De la Rep√ļblica # 51, Tabacalera, 06000 Cuauht√©moc, CDMX
More Info Here

Daniel and I went to Crisanta for Valentine’s Day, and to be honest we left a little disappointed. They advertise themselves as a brewery, but had none of their own beers when we went. It looked like their brewing equipment has been completely disassembled in the back, and upon closer inspection many reviewers have had the same experience. So, don’t go here expecting to try their house beer.

The food was pretty average, and prices kind of high: 190 pesos for a burger or pasta dish, and 80 pesos and up for craft beers. The selection was definitely good, and the open front had a view of the Monument to the Revolution which is lit up beautifully at night. The place was full and had a nice vibe. If you’re in the area check it out to try some craft beers in Mexico City, but even though it bills itself as a brewery, I don’t think it is anymore.

 

HOP: The Beer Experience

Location: Roma 13 Col. Juarez, Mexico City, Mexico 06600
More Info Here

Just so you don’t get confused, there are actually two locations for this brewery (and we visited both). First, I’ll talk about the HOP 1, the original at the location listed above. We walked here after having dinner and drinks at Crisanta, because it was only 15 minutes away.

The place was small but packed. They had about 20 craft beers listed on the wall (ask which ones are their own) and we got a flight. Because it was Valentine’s Day they also gave us a taster of five chocolates to try with the beers. So cute!

 

 

HOP 2, their second location, is in the Narvarte Poniente neighborhood. This the the larger location where their beers are actually brewed. When Daniel and I visited they had only had one of their own beers on tap (the Pale Ale, it was pretty good) but they also had at least 20 other craft options to try.

The brewery was by far my favorite of all of them. The vibe was super cool with picnic tables and lights string across the ceilings. The kitchen is also in a food truck right in the middle of the bar! I actually felt like I was back in the States at a brewery in Chicago or LA. The draft selection at HOP 2 is also great, and you can tell it was curated with care because almost everything we tried was delicious.

HOP 2 is great for groups because all the beers are on tap, so you can get pitchers for a really good price. On Wednesdays, each pitcher also comes with a free large pizza! So, Daniel and I got about 6 beers and a large pepperoni pizza for 250 pesos, in one of the coolest bars in Mexico City… awesome. They also have flights for 125 pesos each, and lots of different deals like all-you-can-eat pizza on Tuesdays.

Finally (if I haven’t already sung its praises enough) HOP 2 has a small shop in the front where you can buy any of your favorite beers to go on your way out. I bought the Chai Tea beer from Error de Diciembre brewing to try at home, and it was delicious.

 

 

Cerveceria Cru Cru

Location: Cjon. of Romita 8, Roma Nte., 06700 Mexico City, CDMX
More Info Here

Ok, this is where Ivan’s insider info really came in handy. He’s good friends with the team at Cru Cru, and told us to go check it out. It’s not officially open to the public, but if you knock on their door they’ll let you in and sell you some craft beer to try. SECRET BREWERY! Guys, it doesn’t get any cooler than this.

Daniel and I went on a Friday evening, (luckily this one was earthquake free) and knocked on the door as instructed. The place is built into a historical monastery with interesting murals on the wall, and they had an arcade machine as well as indoor and outdoor seating. I tried the Gose beer, which is made with grasshoppers… it was pretty interesting. Daniel had the porter which was great.

If you do decide to stop by, try to go around 8pm on Friday or Saturday, when the tours are going to be there, so it’s not to inconvenient for the staff ūüôā

 

four beers from cerveceria cru cru

 

The Tasting Room

Location: Calle de Chiapas 173, Roma Nte., 06700 Cuauthémoc, CDMX
More Info Here

This is a super cool craft beer bar, that I think has only recently branched into brewing. They had two of their Casa Cervecera Morena beers on tap, and I tried the IPA. The flights here are 125 pesos for Mexican beer, but the price goes up if you want a flight of imports.

We were here on a Saturday night and the bar was completely full, the vibe was awesome and modern, and there were at least 20 different craft beers on tap from around the country and the world. I loved it!

 

Principia Tasting Room

Location: Avenida Magdalena 311, Local A, Col del Valle Nte, 03100 Ciudad de México, CDMX
More Info Here

This was the last of the breweries that we tried. Well, actually it’s just a tasting room, but you can try the Principia beers here. I liked the vibe, and when we went they had two of their brews on tap. The rest of the selection was a couple different Mexican breweries, and (not sure why) eight beers from Founders in Michigan. They had some bottled beer options to choose from as well.

It was good for a chill night out. I tried both the Principia beers and two others in a flight for 100 pesos, and they were all pretty good. Their food looked great and I really liked their branding too. My only complaint would be that the selection could use a little more variation.

 

 

 

Awesome Craft Beer Bars

Tried all the breweries and ready for something new? Here are some of my favorite craft beer bars in Mexico City.

 

Roma Biergarten

Location: Calle Querétaro 225, Roma Nte., 06700 Mexico City, CDMX
Perfect for:¬†Getting a drink after a delicious dinner at the Mercado Roma (it’s located right upstairs).
More Info Here

 

Fiebre de Malta

Location: Calle Río Lerma 156, Cuauhtémoc, 06500 Ciudad de México, CDMX
Perfect for: I’m not sure… unfortunately I didn’t have time to make it here, but Ivan recommended it and you know you can trust a local brewer!
More Info Here

 

Fritz Bar and Restaurant

Location: Av. Dr. Río de la Loza 221, Doctores, 06720 Ciudad de México, CDMX
Perfect for: Enjoying a large beer selection before a Lucha Libre event at Arena Mexico.
More Info Here

 

La Belga Beer Store

Location: Calle Querétaro 96, Roma Nte, 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX
Perfect for: Getting a few craft beers to go.
More Info Here

 

The Craft Society

Location: Plaza Luis Cabrera 16, Roma Norte, 06700 Cuauhtemoc, CDMX
Perfect for: Day drinking on a sunny day in Roma.
More Info Here

 

 

Craft Beer Festivals in Mexico City

Finally, don’t miss these festivals celebrating all things craft beer in Mexico City.

Beerfest Texcoco February 24 – 25 || More info here

7th Annual Puebla Beer Fest March 2 – 4 || More info here

7th annual Cervefest March 16 – 18 in Xochimilco || More info here

Cerveza Mexico Oct 26 – 28 || More info here

There’s also a Craft Beer Camp¬†(sounds like a dream come true) and Taco and Beer Fest that happened in 2017. No dates seem to be announced for 2018, but definitely something to keep an eye on.

 

Craft beer in Mexico City is everywhere if you know where to look. Try these breweries and bars to get your fix, and explore the world of Mexico’s microbrews. Support the local beer scene on your next night out with this complete guide!

All my love,
Di

 

 

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